How to pick the best fall protection system to ensure safety

How to pick the best fall protection system to ensure safety

If one has ever worked in an area where employees are forced to work at heights, they’ve probably heard the regulation that they must tie off if one reaches a height of more than 6

If one has ever worked in an area where employees are forced to work at heights, they’ve probably heard the regulation that they must tie off if one reaches a height of more than 6 feet. But what exactly does this imply? If an employee is needed to work over 6 feet from the ground or in a position where there is an unusual danger of injury from falling, some sort of fall protection or fall arrest system┬ámust be employed. Every business that requires work at a height will have a fall safety plan in place.

What are Fall Arrest Systems?

The following are examples of fall arrest systems.

A fall limiting or fall restricting mechanism is the free fall distance under 2 feet. These systems employ the same components as a fall arrest system, but they use a sternal link instead of a rear D-ring connection. These devices can be utilized in situations where the worker is not at a sufficient height to use a standard personal fall arrest system, and the fall cannot be protected. Self-retracting lanyards are included in the fall restriction category because they can limit, but not wholly prevent, a fall.

fall arrest system

Safety nets are one of Europe’s most famous fall protection solutions. Engineers create safety nets to be installed beneath a work area where a fall hazard occurs. These nets can protect building edges, bridgework, and formwork operations. Because they reduce the need for other fall-prevention equipment, safety nets have become a popular choice in the construction sector. Although costly, they save money on additional equipment and time because this sort of fall protection only needs to be put up once rather than every shift.

Personal Fall Detection System (PFDS)

The following components make up a fall arrest system.

  • A harness that covers the entire body
  • A lanyard with a shock absorber, for example.
  • The saddle must be attached to a suitable fixed support, such as a lanyard or a lanyard and lifeline combination.
  • Appropriate anchorage capable of withstanding the falling load’s potential force
  • Before each usage, all fall protective equipment must be inspected for damage, wear, and flaws. Furthermore, all workers required to use fall protection must be adequately trained in its use and maintenance.

Choose the proper fall protection system by taking the time. Before deciding on the optimal strategy, make a thorough assessment of the threats and the surroundings.